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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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image: Passing the Torch

Passing the Torch

By | December 1, 2017

Looking back, looking forward

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image: Researchers Identify Obesity-Diabetes Link

Researchers Identify Obesity-Diabetes Link

By | December 1, 2017

Exosomes produced by macrophages in fatty tissue influence insulin sensitivity in distant cell types, a study finds.

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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

Image of the Day: Skate Youngsters 

By | November 28, 2017

Scientists study the development of scales in skate embryos. 

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image: Genetic Mutation in Amish Linked to Longer Life

Genetic Mutation in Amish Linked to Longer Life

By | November 16, 2017

Mutations in both copies of SERPINE1 can result in blood clotting disorders, but carriers might enjoy longer lifespan and health benefits. 

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image: Immune Checkpoint Found Lacking in Type 1 Diabetes

Immune Checkpoint Found Lacking in Type 1 Diabetes

By | November 15, 2017

Boosting levels of a the immunosuppressive protein PD-L1 in blood stem cells halts diabetes in a mouse model of the disease.

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image: Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

By | November 6, 2017

Asprosin—involved in a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome—targets neurons to stimulate appetite, and blocking the hormone wards off weight gain in rodents.

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