The Scientist

» space biology

Most Recent

image: Basic Science in Orbit

Basic Science in Orbit

By | August 17, 2017

Studying biology in space sheds light on future space missions and life on Earth.

0 Comments

Vinyl cyanide is thought to rain down onto Saturn’s largest moon, though whether the molecule self-assembles into membrane-like structures is unclear.

0 Comments

The plumes that erupt through the cracks on the icy exterior of one of Saturn’s moons contain molecular hydrogen, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Polar Algae Survive More Than a Year in Space

Polar Algae Survive More Than a Year in Space

By | February 13, 2017

Two samples of Sphaerocystis that spent 530 days growing on a panel outside of the International Space Station have returned to Earth largely unscathed.

2 Comments

image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: On Space and Health

Opinion: On Space and Health

By | September 24, 2013

What health and space sciences can learn from each other to boost innovation

1 Comment

image: Radiation Risk for Mars Astronauts

Radiation Risk for Mars Astronauts

By | June 3, 2013

An instrument aboard the spaceship that carried Curiosity to Mars has found that deep space travelers would face worrying levels of radiation.

0 Comments

image: Water Once Ran on Mars

Water Once Ran on Mars

By | October 1, 2012

The Curiosity rover discovers pebbles that were likely formed by ancient streams on the Red Planet.

4 Comments

image: Space-bound Fish

Space-bound Fish

By | July 31, 2012

Japanese astronauts deliver an aquarium to the International Space Station to study the effects of microgravity on marine life.

0 Comments

image: Space Rocks

Space Rocks

By | June 1, 2012

Orbiting ultrasound machines are being used to diagnose and treat astronauts' kidney stones.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech