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In mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.

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image: California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

By | January 15, 2018

Researchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state’s 50,000 or so marijuana farms.

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The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.

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Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.

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image: Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

By | January 5, 2018

Signaling pathways triggered by the mother’s immune system may cause complications during fetal development.

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image: Distinct Regions Drive Responses to Anxiety, Fear

Distinct Regions Drive Responses to Anxiety, Fear

By | January 1, 2018

Researchers map brain activity associated with a person’s anticipation of or direct confrontation with danger.

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image: Infographic: Anticipation Versus Confrontation

Infographic: Anticipation Versus Confrontation

By | January 1, 2018

The brain is activated differently when it’s contemplating, rather than directly facing, a threat.

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image: Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research Dies

Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research Dies

By | December 28, 2017

Ben Barres of Stanford University described glia’s roles in ensuring neurons’ proper synapse formation and in responding to brain injury.

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Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.

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