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In mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.

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Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2018 issue of The Scientist.

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image: David Julius Probes the Molecular Mechanics of Pain

David Julius Probes the Molecular Mechanics of Pain

By | January 1, 2018

For nearly 30 years, the UC San Francisco researcher has delved into unexplored corners of the nervous system.

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image: Distinct Regions Drive Responses to Anxiety, Fear

Distinct Regions Drive Responses to Anxiety, Fear

By | January 1, 2018

Researchers map brain activity associated with a person’s anticipation of or direct confrontation with danger.

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image: Infographic: Anticipation Versus Confrontation

Infographic: Anticipation Versus Confrontation

By | January 1, 2018

The brain is activated differently when it’s contemplating, rather than directly facing, a threat.

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image: Swearing Off Pain

Swearing Off Pain

By | January 1, 2018

Author Emma Byrne runs down the benefits of cursing, among them an enhanced ability to withstand pain.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | January 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Why Swearing and Pain Go Hand in Hand

Why Swearing and Pain Go Hand in Hand

By | January 1, 2018

Screaming obscenities when you stub your toe makes perfect biological sense.

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image: Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research Dies

Neuroscientist and Champion of Glia Research Dies

By | December 28, 2017

Ben Barres of Stanford University described glia’s roles in ensuring neurons’ proper synapse formation and in responding to brain injury.

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