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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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New techniques for activating or suppressing neural activity by zapping the skull’s surface allow researchers to target smaller and deeper areas of the brain.

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image: Studies Yield Clues to Roots of Gulf War Illness

Studies Yield Clues to Roots of Gulf War Illness

By | November 13, 2017

Presentations at the Society for Neuroscience meeting point to changes in neurons and connectivity between brain regions as potential components of the enigmatic condition.

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image: Equivocal Findings of Alzheimer’s Trial Using Young Blood

Equivocal Findings of Alzheimer’s Trial Using Young Blood

By | November 6, 2017

A team of Stanford University researchers say that administering young people’s blood plasma to Alzheimer’s patients could improve cognitive function, but the results have been criticized.

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image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

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image: Implanted Magnetic Probes Measure Brain Activity

Implanted Magnetic Probes Measure Brain Activity

By | November 1, 2017

Micrometer-size magnetrodes detect activity-generated magnetic fields within living brains.

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image: Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

Infographic: Reading the Mind’s Magnetism

By | November 1, 2017

Newly designed sensors detect the magnetic fields generated by electrical activity within cat brains.

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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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