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image: How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

By | January 17, 2018

Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

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image: California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

By | January 15, 2018

Researchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state’s 50,000 or so marijuana farms.

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Scientists are beginning to unravel the ways in which we develop a healthy relationship with the bugs in our bodies.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.

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image: Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away from Extinction 

Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away from Extinction 

By | January 3, 2018

A once critically endangered species of leaf frog has made a comeback. 

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image: The New Species of 2017

The New Species of 2017

By | December 27, 2017

A sampling of some of the fascinating critters identified by scientists this year

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image: Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

Image of the Day: Moth Resurrection

By | December 18, 2017

Entomologists have rediscovered a species of moth that was considered lost for 130 years. 

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image: Image of the Day: Where Have All The Pigeons Gone? 

Image of the Day: Where Have All The Pigeons Gone? 

By | December 8, 2017

A new study sheds light on how the most abundant bird in North America went extinct. 

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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