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The DIY devices collect data and enable light stimulation, chamber agitation, and gas infusion.

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image: Infographic: A 3-D–Printed Ethoscope

Infographic: A 3-D–Printed Ethoscope

By | January 1, 2018

The instrument presents a new option for researchers working on large-scale fly behavior studies.

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image: Image of the Day: Eye of Pig

Image of the Day: Eye of Pig

By | September 6, 2017

This 10-centimeter-wide pig eye replica includes even the most intricate of blood vessels, some no wider than 30 micrometers.

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image: Custom-Made Molecules

Custom-Made Molecules

By | August 21, 2017

A new prototype machine can make the biological molecules of one’s choice from digital DNA sequences.

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image: First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

First Organ-Specific Tissue Sheets

By | August 9, 2017

The material is durable, flexible, and can serve as a scaffold for cell growth, a study shows.

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Researchers have constructed prosthetic female reproductive organs and implanted them in mice, some of which conceived and gave birth to live young.

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image: Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

Image of the Day: Missing Pieces

By | May 12, 2017

Researchers made a 3-D reconstruction of one of neurobiology's most famous brains—that of Henry Gustav Molaison (HM).

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image: Flavor Savors

Flavor Savors

By | January 1, 2016

Odors experienced via the mouth are essential to our sense of taste.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | July 6, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Hip to be Square

Hip to be Square

By | July 6, 2015

Scientists use 3-D printing and computer modeling to demonstrate the advantages of the seahorse’s non-cylindrical tail.

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