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image: Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

By Ashley Yeager | February 9, 2018

The technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.

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Researchers find that while bats in the Myotis genus don’t produce telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, they possess 21 telomere maintenance–related genes.

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Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.

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image: Image of the Day: Dog-Faced Bats

Image of the Day: Dog-Faced Bats

By The Scientist Staff | January 31, 2018

The discovery of two new species within the Cynomops genus has expanded the total known number of dog-faced bat species to eight. 

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These mothers and babies keep each other in their left visual fields during maternal care, which aids right-hemisphere processing. 

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By The Scientist Staff | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Study: UV Light Destroys Bat-Killing Fungus

Study: UV Light Destroys Bat-Killing Fungus

By Katarina Zimmer | January 5, 2018

White nose syndrome has killed millions of bats throughout North America since it was discovered on the continent. 

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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By The Scientist Staff | January 1, 2018

Selected Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

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image: What Bat Quarrels Tell Us About Vocal Learning

What Bat Quarrels Tell Us About Vocal Learning

By Katarina Zimmer | January 1, 2018

New research shows humans aren’t that different from our winged cousins.

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image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By Katarina Zimmer | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.

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