Loading...

The Scientist

» climate change, immunology and evolution

Most Recent

The 20-year project calls into question the conventional wisdom about the role plants will play in mitigating future climate change.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Sad Clownfish?

Image of the Day: Sad Clownfish?

By The Scientist Staff | April 19, 2018

Climate change is bleaching sea anemones, and it’s stressing out the clownfish that live in them.

0 Comments

image: Ocean Heat Wave Wreaked Havoc on Great Barrier Reef

Ocean Heat Wave Wreaked Havoc on Great Barrier Reef

By Ashley Yeager | April 18, 2018

Not only did many corals die in recent years, but some were actually killed by the hotter temperatures themselves, rather than bleaching.

0 Comments

image: How Kidney Cancer Evolves

How Kidney Cancer Evolves

By Jim Daley | April 18, 2018

Renal cell carcinoma tumors have three different evolutionary fates, each associated with specific clinical outcomes.

0 Comments

Genetic analyses uncover cellular hallmarks of bladder cancer tumors that don’t respond, but interfering with one of those characteristics in a mouse model causes tumors to shrink.  

0 Comments

The alterations have been greater under rapidly-climbing global temperatures, suggesting key ecological relationships could be disrupted in the future.

0 Comments

image: New Ovarian Cancer Vaccine Shows Promise

New Ovarian Cancer Vaccine Shows Promise

By Catherine Offord | April 12, 2018

A preliminary clinical trial finds that the personalized therapy improves survival rates and has no severe side-effects.

1 Comment

Authors of a new study suggest that 520-million-year-old structures, previously identified as the brains of ancient arthropods, are instead preserved microbial biofilms.

0 Comments

image: Some Antibiotics Rev Up Host Immune Response to Viruses

Some Antibiotics Rev Up Host Immune Response to Viruses

By Shawna Williams | April 9, 2018

The antimicrobial drug neomycin protects mice from some viral infections, complicating the picture of the relationship between antibiotics and susceptibility to viruses.

2 Comments

image: Opinion: We Have Been Naive About Naive T Cells

Opinion: We Have Been Naive About Naive T Cells

By Theo van den Broek, José A.M. Borghans, and Femke van Wijk | April 6, 2018

Human naive T cells are far more heterogeneous than has long been appreciated, having implications for vaccine strategies.

2 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Estonia Offers Free Genetic Testing to Residents
  2. Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains
  3. The Second March for Science a Smaller Affair
  4. RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea Pigs