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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

By | November 1, 2017

Soluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.

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image: Anger Flares over EPA’s Perceived Science Censorship 

Anger Flares over EPA’s Perceived Science Censorship 

By | October 24, 2017

Protests are sparking over the Trump Administration’s latest move to silence a discussion around climate change. 

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Critics of the proposed curriculum say it leaves out important information relating to climate change and evolution.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | October 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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After Sunday’s federal election, Chancellor Angela Merkel is faced with political parties that disagree on key scientific and environmental issues.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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