The Scientist

» obesity, evolution and immunology

Most Recent

The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

0 Comments

image: European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

By | November 20, 2017

Fotis Kafatos, a Greek researcher famous for his work on malaria, has died at age 77.

0 Comments

A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 

1 Comment

image: Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

Hormone Loss Prevents Obesity and Diabetes in Mice

By | November 6, 2017

Asprosin—involved in a rare disease called neonatal progeroid syndrome—targets neurons to stimulate appetite, and blocking the hormone wards off weight gain in rodents.

0 Comments

image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

0 Comments

image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

0 Comments

image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

0 Comments

image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

0 Comments

Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

1 Comment

image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech