The Scientist

» robot

Most Recent

image: Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots

Cargo-Sorting DNA Robots

By | September 14, 2017

Autonomous molecules that collect, carry, and sort different genetic packages usher in a new era for nucleic-acid robotics. 

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Bird, Plane, or Cyborg?

Image of the Day: Bird, Plane, or Cyborg?

By | June 6, 2017

Rather than attempting to recreate an insect's dynamic agility with robotics, scientists have created a hybrid that's part dragonfly, part robot. 

1 Comment

image: Ghostly Experiment

Ghostly Experiment

By | November 10, 2014

A robot replicates the neurological phenomenon that causes people to feel like another person is nearby.

0 Comments

image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

0 Comments

image: Animal-tronic

Animal-tronic

By | October 1, 2013

Meet a few robots that pose as flesh-and-blood critters to advance science.

0 Comments

image: Robot Mends Hearts in Britain

Robot Mends Hearts in Britain

By | October 24, 2012

A remote-controlled robot helps British surgeons repair heart defects.

0 Comments

image: Cephalopod-Inspired Robot

Cephalopod-Inspired Robot

By | August 17, 2012

A color-changing machine mimics the rubbery body and flexible movements of octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

RayBiotech