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image: Image of the Day: Ancient Moth Wings

Image of the Day: Ancient Moth Wings

By | January 12, 2018

The 200-million-year-old fossils, the earliest found of lepidopterans, show characteristics of extant moths.

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image: Image of the Day: Sea Dinosaur 

Image of the Day: Sea Dinosaur 

By | December 15, 2017

Palaeontologists have discovered the oldest fossil evidence to date for small, stiff-necked, sea-dwelling reptiles. 

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image: Image of the Day: 99-Million-Year-Old Blood Sucker

Image of the Day: 99-Million-Year-Old Blood Sucker

By | December 13, 2017

Scientists have found the oldest known specimen of a blood-sucking insect together with the remains of its host. 

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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image: Image of the Day: Fangaroo

Image of the Day: Fangaroo

By | October 19, 2017

Fanged kangaroos in Australia were thought to have gone extinct 15 million years ago, but new evidence suggests they were around for at least 5 million more years.

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image: Image of the Day: Fossil Guts

Image of the Day: Fossil Guts

By | September 25, 2017

Scientists unearthed an intact, fossilized digestive organ of a 500-million-year-old trilobite—a prehistoric relative of the horseshoe crab.

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image: Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

Mongolian Dinosaurs and the Poaching Problem

By | September 8, 2017

High-profile cases of poached fossils shine a light on the black market for paleontological specimens—and how scientists and governments are trying to stop it.

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

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