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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

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image: Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

By | August 8, 2017

A failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.

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Injecting photosynthetic microbes into oxygen-starved heart tissue can improve cardiac function in rodents. 

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image: PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk

PCSK9 Drug Reduces Heart Disease Risk

By | March 22, 2017

A cholesterol-lowering drug significantly cut the risk of heart attack and stroke in a recent study. But is it worth the steep cost?

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image: Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function

Donor Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function

By | October 12, 2016

After a heart attack, monkeys given induced pluripotent stem cell–derived cardiomyocytes show more regeneration in the organ, but with risks.

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image: If It Ain't Broke . . .

If It Ain't Broke . . .

By | January 1, 2016

Is there room to improve upon the tried-and-true, decades-old technology of artificial hearts?

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image: Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury

Gel Heals Heart Attack Injury

By | September 17, 2015

A collagen patch seeded with a regenerative protein helps mice and pigs regain cardiac function after a heart attack.

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image: Stress, Bacteria Trigger Heart Attack?

Stress, Bacteria Trigger Heart Attack?

By | June 12, 2014

A study implicates the breaking up of bacterial biofilms on fatty plaques in arteries as causing stroke or heart attack following stress.

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image: Exosomes Vital for Heart Repair

Exosomes Vital for Heart Repair

By | May 6, 2014

Reparations after a heart attack in mice depend not on stem cells, but on the exosomes they secrete.

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image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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