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image: Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPR

Resistance to HIV Engineered Via CRISPR

By | August 3, 2017

Mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells that have an HIV receptor gene, CCR5, disrupted by gene editing allows the animals to ward off HIV infection. 

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image: HIV Quickly Invades the Brain

HIV Quickly Invades the Brain

By | March 30, 2015

The virus that causes AIDS can replicate and mutate in the brain as early as four months after initial infection, according to a new study.

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image: How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

How HIV Destroys Immune Cells

By | December 19, 2013

During HIV infection, CD4 T cells in lymphoid tissues initiate a highly inflammatory form of cell death that helps cripple the immune system.  

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image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

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image: SIV and the Expanding Virome

SIV and the Expanding Virome

By | October 11, 2012

Monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus have a higher diversity of gut viruses, pointing to a possible role of the virome in SIV pathogenesis.

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