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The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.

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Scientists are beginning to unravel the ways in which we develop a healthy relationship with the bugs in our bodies.

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image: Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

By | January 5, 2018

Signaling pathways triggered by the mother’s immune system may cause complications during fetal development.

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image: 2017 in Quotes

2017 in Quotes

By | December 28, 2017

Gender discrimination, Brexit, and climate change are among the issues that have received considerable attention from the scientific community this year.

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image: Women Surveyed About Sexual Harassment Tell Their Stories

Women Surveyed About Sexual Harassment Tell Their Stories

By | December 13, 2017

Marie Claire speaks with researchers who’d reported abuse in studies of harassment in the field.

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image: Max Planck Society Seeks to Keep More Women as Faculty

Max Planck Society Seeks to Keep More Women as Faculty

By | December 6, 2017

The German research institution will invest more than $35 million in creating tenure-track positions for female scientists. 

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Water bears can reanimate after years of desiccation—and gel-forming proteins unique to the animals may explain how.

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image: Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

Microbes of the Human Tongue Form Organized Clusters

By | December 5, 2017

Bacteria on the tongue’s surface reside in clumps distinguished by genus, unlike the intermingled communities observed in other tissues.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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Among this year’s winners are a geneticist who revealed how plants respond to shade and a group of physicists who mapped the universe’s background radiation.

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