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image: Army Surgeons Grow Ear in Soldier’s Arm

Army Surgeons Grow Ear in Soldier’s Arm

By Catherine Offord | May 11, 2018

The woman’s own cartilage was used to construct the transplant after she lost her left ear in a car crash.

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After losing his genitals in a roadside bomb explosion, the soldier endured a 14-hour surgery to have a donated penis, scrotum, and partial abdominal wall attached.

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image: Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains

Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains

By Ashley Yeager | April 16, 2018

After implantation, the tissue developed blood vessels and became integrated into neuronal networks in the animals’ brains.

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image: 2017 in Quotes

2017 in Quotes

By Catherine Offord | December 28, 2017

Gender discrimination, Brexit, and climate change are among the issues that have received considerable attention from the scientific community this year.

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The group calls for the retraction of six publications by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini regarding the synthetic trachea transplantations that led to the death of at least three patients. 

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image: Image of the Day: Brand New Bowel

Image of the Day: Brand New Bowel

By The Scientist Staff | October 13, 2017

Using human stems cells and segments of rat intestines, scientists engineer bowels that are capable of absorbing nutrients.

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Tissue recipients were treated as “guinea pigs,” says investigation leader.

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Four products have already qualified for the regenerative medicine advanced therapy (RMAT) designation that provides extra interactions with the agency, and sooner.

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The diabetic volunteer continued to produce insulin one year after she received a transplant of abdominal islet cells.

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image: Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

Synthetic Bones: A Better Bone-Marrow Transplant?

By Ashley P. Taylor | May 9, 2017

Artificial bones produce new blood cells in mice, obviating the need for irradiation to kill off resident hematopoietic stem cells in recipients.

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