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image: A Growing Open Access Toolbox

A Growing Open Access Toolbox

By | November 28, 2017

Legal methods to retrieve paywalled articles for free are on the rise, but better self-archiving practices could help improve accessibility. 

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image: ResearchGate Restricts Access to Nearly 2 Million Articles

ResearchGate Restricts Access to Nearly 2 Million Articles

By | November 9, 2017

The academic social network is bending to pressure from publishing giants that demand it removes copyrighted material from its site.

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A US judge issues a broad injunction that allows the society to demand that technology companies actively associated with the site block access to it.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Opinion: Share Your Data

Opinion: Share Your Data

By , , and | October 24, 2017

Our analysis of a collection of open-access datasets quantifies their benefit to the scientific community.

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image: Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

Germany Sees Drastic Decrease in Insects

By | October 18, 2017

A 27-year-long study finds insect biomass has declined by about 75 percent. 

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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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The American Chemical Society seeks a broad order that includes millions of dollars in damages and demands action from Internet service providers and search engines. 

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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