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image: US Research Integrity Head Temporarily Leaves Post

US Research Integrity Head Temporarily Leaves Post

By | November 21, 2017

Kathy Partin, whose staff had expressed concerns about changes she instituted, was reportedly asked to leave.

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An open letter from hundreds of faculty members in the U.S. and abroad declares they won’t encourage students to pursue education or careers there.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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Investigations into cases of wrongdoing by professors are increasingly in the public eye. But are colleges and universities doing enough to deal with the problem?

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The professors, all faculty members in the college’s department of psychology and brain sciences, have been placed on paid leave. 

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The group calls for the retraction of six publications by surgeon Paolo Macchiarini regarding the synthetic trachea transplantations that led to the death of at least three patients. 

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image: New Dean of USC Medical School Fired

New Dean of USC Medical School Fired

By | October 6, 2017

Rohit Varma’s termination, following the recent resignation of his predecessor over misbehavior, came as the Los Angeles Times prepared to report on a 2003 sexual harassment case.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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