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The finding confirms that a cluster of cells that directs the fate of other cells in the developing embryo is evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom.

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image: Ebola Update: Funding, Vaccines, and More Deaths in DRC

Ebola Update: Funding, Vaccines, and More Deaths in DRC

By Catherine Offord | May 23, 2018

A total of 27 people have died since April, but new funds and the deployment of an experimental vaccine are expected to help contain the virus.

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Victoria, a southern white rhino at the San Diego Zoo, was impregnated by artificial insemination on March 22 and, if all goes well, will birth the calf in summer 2019.

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image: Image of the Day: <em>Xenopus</em> Pigment

Image of the Day: Xenopus Pigment

By The Scientist Staff | May 18, 2018

Researchers recently used CRISPR single-guide RNAs to alter genes involved in pigmentation in frog embryos.

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A new statistical method finds that many genetic variants used to determine trait-disease relationships may have additional effects that GWAS analyses don’t pick up.

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As the virus spreads in Democratic Republic of Congo, the World Health Organization is preparing to immunize people as soon as this week.

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image: “Minibrains” May Soon Include Neanderthal DNA

“Minibrains” May Soon Include Neanderthal DNA

By Ashley Yeager | May 14, 2018

Brain organoids engineered to carry the genetic material could reveal how our brains are similar to and different from those of our closest relatives.

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image: Measles Cases On the Rise in England

Measles Cases On the Rise in England

By Jim Daley | May 11, 2018

The increase is associated with travel to Europe, where large outbreaks are occurring.

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image: Origin of Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Found

Origin of Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Found

By Ruth Williams | May 10, 2018

DNA evidence points to Asian amphibians as the source of a fatal disease that has been wiping out frogs across the globe.  

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Sequencing of a single gene can spot patients with a dangerous form of mycosis fungoides better than other prognostic tests.  

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