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In mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.

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The DIY devices collect data and enable light stimulation, chamber agitation, and gas infusion.

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image: Infographic: A 3-D–Printed Ethoscope

Infographic: A 3-D–Printed Ethoscope

By Ruth Williams | January 1, 2018

The instrument presents a new option for researchers working on large-scale fly behavior studies.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By The Scientist Staff | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Image of the Day: Mitochondria, Live and in Color

Image of the Day: Mitochondria, Live and in Color

By The Scientist Staff | September 27, 2017

Mitochondria age differently depending upon whether they’re located in the liver, heart, or kidney, scientists find in flies and mice.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By Diana Kwon | February 28, 2017

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: To Attract Pollinators, Flower Mimics Wounded Bee

To Attract Pollinators, Flower Mimics Wounded Bee

By Ben Andrew Henry | October 7, 2016

Umbrella flowers lure in flies by mimicking the alarm signals produced by the flies’ preferred prey.

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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2014

Selected Images of the Day from www.the-scientist.com

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image: Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

Insect-Inspired Sensors Improve Tiny Robot’s Flight

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | June 18, 2014

Microroboticists have designed simple sensors based on insect light organs called ocelli to stabilize a miniature flying robot.

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image: Stripes Shoo Flies

Stripes Shoo Flies

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | April 4, 2014

Zebras evolved stripes to prevent pesky biting flies from landing on them, a study finds.

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