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A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

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image: How to Make Scientists Into Better Peer Reviewers

How to Make Scientists Into Better Peer Reviewers

By Abby Olena | February 1, 2018

From efforts to increase the transparency of the review process to initiatives offering training, there are many attempts underway to make better reviewers out of researchers.

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image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.

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Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.

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image: Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

By The Scientist Staff | January 24, 2018

Insect wings may have evolved from multiple origins, say researchers.

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image: South Korean Universities Make Deal with Elsevier

South Korean Universities Make Deal with Elsevier

By Katarina Zimmer | January 17, 2018

A consortium of 300 universities and college libraries had taken a strong stance against the publishing giant’s price hikes. 

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Ashutosh Tiwari, who falsely claimed to be affiliated with Linköping University, is also under investigation for alleged scientific misconduct and fraud.

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