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» memory, evolution and ecology

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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

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In people with epilepsy, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) does not affect memory-related brainwaves as widely claimed, researchers report.

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image: Lessons in Memory from a Champ

Lessons in Memory from a Champ

By | November 1, 2017

A four-time winner of the USA Memory Championship is helping scientists understand how the brain works.

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image: Memory Master

Memory Master

By | November 1, 2017

Four-time USA Memory Champion Nelson Dellis reveals some of his memory-training tactics.

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image: The Wada Test, 1948

The Wada Test, 1948

By | November 1, 2017

A decades-old neurological procedure developed under unique and difficult conditions in postwar Japan remains critical to the treatment of epilepsy.

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image: These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

These Flies Hijack Frogs’ Love Calls

By | November 1, 2017

The phenomenon is one of the few examples of eavesdropping across the vertebrate/invertebrate barrier.

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image: These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

These Flies Suck. . . Frogs

By | November 1, 2017

Insects feast on amorous tungara frogs by eavesdropping on their amphibian love songs.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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