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image: California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

California’s Owls Being Exposed to Rat Poison

By | January 15, 2018

Researchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state’s 50,000 or so marijuana farms.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.

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image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.

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image: The Year in Science Policy

The Year in Science Policy

By | December 15, 2017

How a new administration in the U.S. affected scientists around the world throughout 2017

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image: Study: Fracking Linked to Low Birth Weight in Newborns

Study: Fracking Linked to Low Birth Weight in Newborns

By | December 15, 2017

Scientist find that living near a hydraulic fracturing site for gas and oil extraction could have adverse effects on infant health. 

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A federal court had ordered the Idaho Fish and Game Department to destroy data collected from a protected wilderness area. 

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The approval of the Roundup ingredient follows an extensive debate amidst conflicting evidence over the health effects of the world’s most popular weed killer. 

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The report provides evidence that goes against concerns that Monsanto’s popular herbicide, Roundup, is carcinogenic. 

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image: Professor Sues <em>PNAS</em> Over Paper Criticisms

Professor Sues PNAS Over Paper Criticisms

By | November 2, 2017

Stanford’s Mark Jacobson is asking for $10 million in damages after the journal published a critique of his work on renewable energy.

7 Comments

image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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