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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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image: Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

Researchers Identify Clue to Asymmetric Cell Division

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a surface protein on endosomes is key to the organelles’ uneven distribution in daughter cells.

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image: Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

Infographic: Why Not All Cell Divisions Are Equal

By | September 1, 2017

Phosphorylation of a protein called Sara found on the surface of endosomes appears to be a key regulator of asymmetric splitting in fruit flies.

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image: Cell Cannibalism as Cancer Defense

Cell Cannibalism as Cancer Defense

By | July 11, 2017

A new study suggests that the mysterious process by which one cell consumes another may be triggered by cell division, potentially helping to fight tumor growth.

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image: Image of the Day: Faster Than a Speeding Root Tip

Image of the Day: Faster Than a Speeding Root Tip

By | May 16, 2017

Cells within the growing root tip of an Arabidopsis plant elongate and divide, driving it forward in search of nutrients.

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Mice engineered to overproduce the organelles involved in cell division spontaneously develop malignancies.

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image: Haploid Stem Cells Created

Haploid Stem Cells Created

By | March 18, 2016

A method that forces human eggs to divide can produce embryonic stem cells capable of division and differentiation with only one copy of each gene.

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image: How Multicellularity Arose

How Multicellularity Arose

By | January 11, 2016

Researchers identify a molecule that may have been key to the surprisingly common transition from single-celled ancestors to today’s complex, multicellular organisms. 

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image: Carry-On Luggage

Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

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image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

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