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image: Image of the Day: The Last Sloth

Image of the Day: The Last Sloth

By | November 16, 2017

An artist’s impression suggests what the Caribbean may have looked like before humans arrived. 

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image: Fire Ant Rafts

Fire Ant Rafts

By | November 1, 2017

The invasive insects weathered extreme climatic conditions by banding together and riding out Hurricane Harvey's flood waters.

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image: Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

Tracking Invasive Fire Ants in Asia

By | November 1, 2017

These insect transplants have the potential to wreak economic havoc by outcompeting native insects and destroying crops.

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image: Check Out This 3-D Interactive Fire Ant Model

Check Out This 3-D Interactive Fire Ant Model

By | October 31, 2017

Explore the many facets of this invasive species.

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image: Gigantic “Tree Lobsters” Not Extinct After All

Gigantic “Tree Lobsters” Not Extinct After All

By | October 9, 2017

Researchers identify the Lord Howe Island stick insect on the remains of a large volcano in the Tasman Sea between Australia and New Zealand.

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image: North American Ash on Brink of Extinction

North American Ash on Brink of Extinction

By | September 15, 2017

The latest IUCN Red List update also reveals substantial declines in antelopes and other species, but some level of recovery in populations of snow leopards.

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image: Driving Down Pests

Driving Down Pests

By | August 28, 2017

A computer model estimates that gene-drive technology could wipe out populations of an invasive mammal on islands. 

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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