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Mice who get less attention from their mothers have more copies of a common retrotransposon in the genomes of their hippocampal neurons.


A study finds that the vaccine’s effects wear off as a person ages, suggesting a need for booster shots.


In response to short DNA fragments, lymphocytes release mitochondrial DNA that helps trigger an immune response.


image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.


image: Image of the Day: Inner Glow

Image of the Day: Inner Glow

By The Scientist Staff | February 26, 2018

Researchers engineered a system for bioluminescent imaging that is as much as 1,000 times stronger than existing methods.


image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

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Researchers were able to slow tumor growth in a mouse model of human ovarian cancer. 


Researchers develop a new technique to selectively activate neurons deep in the rodent brain, taking a step toward noninvasive brain stimulation for neurological disorders.


The test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.

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image: How Viruses Attack Plants

How Viruses Attack Plants

By Claire Asher | February 1, 2018

Viruses are incapable of reproducing without the help of a host, whose cells copy their genetic material and fabricate the building blocks of new virus particles.


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