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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

By | August 11, 2017

The turtle-headed sea snake is losing its stripes, and researchers suggest that the change reflects adaptation to fouled oceans.

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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image: Lords of the Flies

Lords of the Flies

By | June 19, 2017

Biologists’ walk in the woods sparks the creation of a masterful fruit fly field guide. 

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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