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image: Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

Image of the Day: Cell Droplets

By The Scientist Staff | April 4, 2018

Proteins and RNA aggregate into “membraneless organelles” due to liquid-liquid phase separation.

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image: Image of the Day: New Neurons

Image of the Day: New Neurons

By The Scientist Staff | March 28, 2018

Scientists discover a molecular factor that allows them to follow neurons from birth to maturity.

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image: Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

By Catherine Offord | March 28, 2018

Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 

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image: Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 27, 2018

By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  

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image: Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

By The Scientist Staff | March 21, 2018

Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.

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image: Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

By Catherine Offord | March 20, 2018

A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.

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Researchers find that modern human populations carry distinct sets of genes from the extinct hominin species.

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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

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image: Image of the Day: Living Color

Image of the Day: Living Color

By The Scientist Staff | March 8, 2018

Biodegradable pigments could be custom-grown by bacteria in the future, say researchers.  

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image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

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