The Scientist

» elephant

Most Recent

image: Image of the Day: Elephant Twins

Image of the Day: Elephant Twins

By The Scientist Staff | April 16, 2018

A pair of calves was born about eight months ago in Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park.

0 Comments

Gene flow between elephant species was a common feature of their evolutionary history.

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Elephants at Sunset

Image of the Day: Elephants at Sunset

By The Scientist Staff | January 11, 2018

Conflict threatens already at-risk wildlife populations and conservation efforts in war-torn areas.

0 Comments

image: China Vows to End Commercial Ivory Trade

China Vows to End Commercial Ivory Trade

By Joshua A. Krisch | January 4, 2017

Conservationists declare victory as the country agrees to crack down on domestic ivory sales, which have contributed to the near-extinction of elephant species.

0 Comments

image: Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

Elephant Footprints Create Habitat for Tiny Aquatic Creatures

By Catherine Offord | December 1, 2016

Researchers discover diverse communities of invertebrates inhabiting the water-filled tracks of elephants in Uganda.

0 Comments

image: A Plague on Pachyderms

A Plague on Pachyderms

By Jef Akst | June 1, 2015

At least seven species of herpesvirus commonly infect elephants. At zoos, keepers scramble to save calves, who are particularly vulnerable to the viruses.

5 Comments

image: TS Live: Elephant Herpes

TS Live: Elephant Herpes

By Jef Akst | June 1, 2015

Researchers at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., are studying a viral infection that can be lethal to elephant calves.

0 Comments

image: Discerning Elephants

Discerning Elephants

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | March 12, 2014

Elephants are able to tell human voices apart based on cues for age, sex, and ethnic group.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By Rina Shaikh-Lesko | February 27, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

0 Comments

image: On Point

On Point

By Abby Olena | October 11, 2013

Researchers demonstrate that elephants can use human pointing cues to find hidden food.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Prominent Salk Institute Scientist Inder Verma Resigns
  2. Dartmouth Professor Investigated for Sexual Misconduct Retires
  3. Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud
    The Nutshell Theranos Leaders Indicted For Fraud

    Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges that allege the company’s promise to revolutionize blood testing swindled investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and put patients in danger.

  4. Probiotics Prevent Cholera in Animal Models