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The BMJ inquiry finds that researchers presented only select results from animal experiments when applying for funding and approval for human trials.

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image: Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

By | January 9, 2018

Scientists study the unusual genome evolution of the bacteria that live within a genus of cicadas. 

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image: Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

By | January 8, 2018

Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 

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image: Image of the Day: See You Later!

Image of the Day: See You Later!

By | January 8, 2018

Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow. 

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image: Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse Fetuses

By | January 5, 2018

Signaling pathways triggered by the mother’s immune system may cause complications during fetal development.

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image: Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

Alcohol Damages Mouse DNA

By | January 3, 2018

A byproduct of alcohol consumption causes mutations in the DNA of mouse blood stem cells, and some of the breaks are not repaired.

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image: Infographic: A Painful Pathway

Infographic: A Painful Pathway

By | January 1, 2018

Since the mid-2000s, the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.7 has emerged as a promising target for a new class of analgesics.

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image: Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

Targeting Sodium Channels for Pain Relief

By | January 1, 2018

The race to develop analgesic drugs that inhibit sodium channel NaV1.7 is revealing a complex sensory role for the protein.

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Researchers uncover a family of compounds that may be involved in pain transmission.

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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