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A closer moon and ideal coastal conditions for tide pool formation may have started the evolutionary transition of tetrapods.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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image: An Enduring Partnership

An Enduring Partnership

By Bob Grant | February 1, 2018

Humanity would be nothing without plants. It’s high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.

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Over the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.

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More than 3,500 scientists had signed an open letter to NIH Director Francis Collins opposing the rules change.

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image: Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

Image of the Day: Ectopic Wings

By The Scientist Staff | January 24, 2018

Insect wings may have evolved from multiple origins, say researchers.

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Both higher education and industry associations were advocating for a later implementation date for the Common Rule, which governs human studies.

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image: CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients Proposed

CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients Proposed

By Katarina Zimmer | January 19, 2018

US researchers could become the first outside China to use the gene-editing technique in the clinic. 

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The BMJ inquiry finds that researchers presented only select results from animal experiments when applying for funding and approval for human trials.

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image: Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

Image of the Day: Minions of the Cicada 

By The Scientist Staff | January 9, 2018

Scientists study the unusual genome evolution of the bacteria that live within a genus of cicadas. 

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