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Authors of a new study suggest that 520-million-year-old structures, previously identified as the brains of ancient arthropods, are instead preserved microbial biofilms.

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image: Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

Image of the Day: Fungal Fireworks

By The Scientist Staff | June 26, 2017

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus begins to grow biofilms as it develops into a larger intertwined network.

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image: Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

By The Scientist Staff | May 10, 2017

Fossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.

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image: Stress, Bacteria Trigger Heart Attack?

Stress, Bacteria Trigger Heart Attack?

By Jef Akst | June 12, 2014

A study implicates the breaking up of bacterial biofilms on fatty plaques in arteries as causing stroke or heart attack following stress.

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image: Film Stars

Film Stars

By Anna Azvolinsky | June 1, 2014

Engineered bacteria can shape electricity-conducting nanowires.

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By Abby Olena | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Thwarting Persistence

Thwarting Persistence

By Abby Olena | November 13, 2013

Researchers show that activating an endogenous protease can eliminate bacterial persisters.

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image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By Mohamed Y. El-Naggar and Steven E. Finkel | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.

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image: Electric Microbe Hairs

Electric Microbe Hairs

By Mohamed Y. El-Naggar and Steven E. Finkel | May 1, 2013

USC researcher Mohamed El-Naggar demonstrates how some bacteria grow electrical wires that allow them to link up in big biological circuits.

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image: Electron Shuffle

Electron Shuffle

By Mohamed Y. El-Naggar and Steven E. Finkel | May 1, 2013

Shewanella bacteria generate energy for survival by transporting electrons to nearby mineral surfaces.

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