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Reuters sheds light on the largely unregulated trade of human body parts taken from human cadavers donated for science. 

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image: Image of the Day: Beetle Penis 

Image of the Day: Beetle Penis 

By | December 22, 2017

Scientists look to a leaf beetle’s genitals for lessons on improving catheter strength.  

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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image: A Prosthetic Advantage?

A Prosthetic Advantage?

By | September 1, 2017

Scientists are analyzing how factors such as the length and stiffness of artificial limbs affect performance in athletes with amputations.

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image: Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

Image of the Day: Un-break My Heart

By | August 8, 2017

A failing heart is easily distinguished from a healthy one by numerous tell-tale signs, including its slender, stretched-out walls, increased size, and pooled blood clots.

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image: Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

Heart’s Backup Pacemaker Mechanisms Identified

By | July 28, 2017

The sinoatrial node is home to multiple pacemakers that keep the heart beating if the main one falters.

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A new anatomical view of the mesentery, which surrounds the lower abdomen, suggests that it should be considered the human body’s 79th organ.

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image: Why Can’t Macaques Talk Like Humans?

Why Can’t Macaques Talk Like Humans?

By | December 13, 2016

Anatomical analysis suggests monkeys possess all the hardware for human-like speech, they just lack the neurological capacity to use it.

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image: Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

By | November 1, 2016

The results suggest that breathing is orchestrated by three—rather than two—excitatory circuits in the medulla.

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image: Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

By | November 1, 2016

This third excitatory network helps to regulate postinspiration.

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