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The finding confirms that a cluster of cells that directs the fate of other cells in the developing embryo is evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom.

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image: Lizards’ Green Blood Evolved Four Times

Lizards’ Green Blood Evolved Four Times

By Kerry Grens | May 16, 2018

The uncommon hue is present in skinks that aren’t closely related, but the advantage of the odd trait remains anyone’s guess.  

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image: Image of the Day: Hold My Brood

Image of the Day: Hold My Brood

By The Scientist Staff | May 9, 2018

Cuckoo catfish trick cichlids into caring for their eggs in a strategy known as brood parasitism.

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image: Image of the Day: Bird Braincase

Image of the Day: Bird Braincase

By The Scientist Staff | May 4, 2018

Newly discovered fossils shed light on the structure of the feeding apparatus of ancient seabirds.

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A study finds two species of guenon monkeys in Tanzania have been mating and producing fertile offspring for generations.

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image: Genetic Adaptation to Cold Brought Migraines With It

Genetic Adaptation to Cold Brought Migraines With It

By Viviane Callier | May 3, 2018

Humans living in higher latitudes tend to have a variant of a gene involved in sensing cold temperatures, but it comes with a cost.  

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image: Rare Disease Geneticist: A Profile of Uta Francke

Rare Disease Geneticist: A Profile of Uta Francke

By Anna Azvolinsky | May 1, 2018

The Stanford University human geneticist identified the genes and genomic abnormalities underlying numerous rare diseases, including Rett  syndrome, and advanced the field of molecular diagnostics. 

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Rather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.

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Drug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.

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image: Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger Spleens

Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger Spleens

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 19, 2018

The adaptation gives better endurance to the Bajau people, known as sea nomads, by increasing spleen size and, in turn, boosting the number of oxygenated red blood cells when diving.  

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