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» history, culture and immunology

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A study finds that the vaccine’s effects wear off as a person ages, suggesting a need for booster shots.

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In response to short DNA fragments, lymphocytes release mitochondrial DNA that helps trigger an immune response.


image: The Child Hatchery, 1896

The Child Hatchery, 1896

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

The incubator exhibitions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries publicized the care of premature babies.


image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.


image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | March 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.


The animal pictures and hand stencils were made in caves in Spain thousands of years before Homo sapiens arrived in Europe.


image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

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The test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.

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image: Contributors


By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2018 issue of The Scientist.


image: How Viruses Attack Plants

How Viruses Attack Plants

By Claire Asher | February 1, 2018

Viruses are incapable of reproducing without the help of a host, whose cells copy their genetic material and fabricate the building blocks of new virus particles.


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