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image: A Radical Intervention, 1894

A Radical Intervention, 1894

By Catherine Offord | April 1, 2018

William Halsted’s approach to mastectomy took the medical world by storm at the turn of the last century.

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image: The Child Hatchery, 1896

The Child Hatchery, 1896

By Catherine Offord | March 1, 2018

The incubator exhibitions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries publicized the care of premature babies.

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image: Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

Bathtub Bloodbath, 1793

By Shawna Williams | October 1, 2017

French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat took on many roles over the course of his life, including physician and scientist.

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image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By Shawna Williams | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.

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image: Art’s Diagnosticians

Art’s Diagnosticians

By Abby Olena | June 12, 2017

Physicians peer into the subjects of artistic masterpieces, and find new perspective on their own approach to diagnosing maladies.

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image: Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

Self-Experimentation Led to the Discovery of IgE

By Andrea Anderson | June 1, 2017

In the 1960s, immunologists took matters into their own hands—and under their own skin—to characterize an immunoglobulin involved in allergies.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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In the middle of the 20th century, the National Cancer Institute began testing plant extracts for chemotherapeutic potential—helping to discover some drugs still in use today.

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image: Newton’s Color Theory, ca. 1665

Newton’s Color Theory, ca. 1665

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 1, 2017

Newton’s rainbow forms the familiar ROYGBIV because he thought the range of visible colors should be analogous to the seven-note musical scale.

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image: 19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

19th Century Experiments Explained How Trees Lift Water

By Ben Andrew Henry | February 1, 2017

A maple branch and shattered equipment led to the cohesion-tension theory, the counterintuitive claim that water’s movement against gravity involves no action by trees.

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