The Scientist

» dog, culture, developmental biology and immunology

Most Recent

Sequencing of a single gene can spot patients with a dangerous form of mycosis fungoides better than other prognostic tests.  

0 Comments

The agency says it has taken various steps to ensure the privacy of participants’ data. 

0 Comments

The extracellular matrix appears to inhibit regeneration; but scientists debate whether heart muscle really comes back.  

0 Comments

image: Image of the Day: Swiss Army Crustacean

Image of the Day: Swiss Army Crustacean

By The Scientist Staff | May 2, 2018

The tools researchers used to study how this amphipod’s limbs develop could help inform our understanding of cell lineages and fates.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Power of Rare</em>

Book Excerpt from The Power of Rare

By Victoria Jackson and Michael Yeaman | May 1, 2018

In chapter 4, “Building a Cure Machine,” author Victoria Jackson reveals the challenges in launching a foundation focused on funding research on a rare disease.

0 Comments

Researchers stumbled across the connection while searching for ways to reduce vision problems in people with achromatopsia.

0 Comments

The devices, which could one day treat children with esophageal atresia and short bowel, were recently tested in pigs.

0 Comments

image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

0 Comments

A trio of papers provide new insight into embryo development.

0 Comments

image: Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune Reaction

Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune Reaction

By Ruth Williams | April 25, 2018

Immune cells targeting maternal antigens are abundant in the blood of premature infants, suggesting fetal intolerance of mom may instigate early labor.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. RNA Moves a Memory From One Snail to Another
  2. Sweden Cancels Agreement With Elsevier Over Open Access
  3. Researchers Develop a Drug Against the Common Cold
  4. Army Surgeons Grow Ear in Soldier’s Arm