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The compound, BCI-838, is already in human clinical trials as a possible treatment for depression.

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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.

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image: Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

By Abby Olena | January 8, 2018

Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 

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The genome of an infant who lived in Alaska thousands of years ago represents a previously unknown group of humans called Ancient Beringians, who share a common lineage with other Native Americans. 

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image: CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

By Abby Olena | December 20, 2017

Researchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears. 

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.

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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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image: The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

By Abby Olena | December 6, 2017

Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.

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