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image: Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger Spleens

Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger Spleens

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 19, 2018

The adaptation gives better endurance to the Bajau people, known as sea nomads, by increasing spleen size and, in turn, boosting the number of oxygenated red blood cells when diving.  

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image: Some Antibiotics Rev Up Host Immune Response to Viruses

Some Antibiotics Rev Up Host Immune Response to Viruses

By Shawna Williams | April 9, 2018

The antimicrobial drug neomycin protects mice from some viral infections, complicating the picture of the relationship between antibiotics and susceptibility to viruses.

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The drugs’ disruption of the microbiome makes a subsequent flavivirus infection more severe.

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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

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Including microbiome composition in predictions of whether a person is obese can significantly improve their accuracy, according to an analysis.

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Thousands of axons grew from the transplants and connected to damaged primate tissue, the first such demonstration in primates.

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image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

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image: Gene Expression Overlaps Among Psychiatric Disorders

Gene Expression Overlaps Among Psychiatric Disorders

By Ashley P. Taylor | February 8, 2018

Transcriptional profiling of post-mortem human brains reveals commonalities in the genes over- and under-expressed in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, and major depression. 

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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.

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