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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  


Including microbiome composition in predictions of whether a person is obese can significantly improve their accuracy, according to an analysis.


image: Gene Expression Overlaps Among Psychiatric Disorders

Gene Expression Overlaps Among Psychiatric Disorders

By Ashley P. Taylor | February 8, 2018

Transcriptional profiling of post-mortem human brains reveals commonalities in the genes over- and under-expressed in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, and major depression. 


image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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image: Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

By Abby Olena | January 8, 2018

Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 


The genome of an infant who lived in Alaska thousands of years ago represents a previously unknown group of humans called Ancient Beringians, who share a common lineage with other Native Americans. 


image: CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

CRISPR Helps Mice Hear

By Abby Olena | December 20, 2017

Researchers reduce the severity of hereditary deafness in mice with the delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 protein-RNA complexes that inactivate a mutant gene in their inner ears. 


Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.


Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.


image: The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

The Biggest DNA Origami Structures Yet

By Abby Olena | December 6, 2017

Three new strategies for using DNA to generate large, self-assembling shapes create everything from a nanoscale teddy bear to a nanoscale Mona Lisa.


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