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Authors of a new study suggest that 520-million-year-old structures, previously identified as the brains of ancient arthropods, are instead preserved microbial biofilms.

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image: Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

By Ruth Williams | March 29, 2018

A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  

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image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  

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image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  

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image: Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

By Abby Olena | February 2, 2018

In one of the first looks at the urinary virome, researchers find hundreds of viruses, most of which have never been sequenced before. 

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image: How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

By Abby Olena | January 17, 2018

Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

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image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By Shawna Williams | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By Ashley Yeager | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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