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Researchers find that conserving marsupials on a predator-free island dampens their avoidance behaviors, which could mean trouble for their reintroduction to mainland Australia.

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image: Cell Transplant Trial for Spinal Injury Is Safe

Cell Transplant Trial for Spinal Injury Is Safe

By Ruth Williams | June 1, 2018

The first human experiment with neural precursor cells implanted to treat chronic spinal cord injury suggests the procedure is safe, and hints at a small benefit.  

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image: Human-Specific Genes Implicated in Brain Size

Human-Specific Genes Implicated in Brain Size

By Abby Olena | May 31, 2018

Three members of a gene family called NOTCH2NL may have been involved in the evolution of humans’ big cortex.

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The finding confirms that a cluster of cells that directs the fate of other cells in the developing embryo is evolutionarily conserved across the animal kingdom.

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The extracellular matrix appears to inhibit regeneration; but scientists debate whether heart muscle really comes back.  

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image: How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

By Shawna Williams | April 30, 2018

Scientists work out the specific genes and biochemical steps required for digesting the very drugs designed to kill microbes.

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image: Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune Reaction

Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune Reaction

By Ruth Williams | April 25, 2018

Immune cells targeting maternal antigens are abundant in the blood of premature infants, suggesting fetal intolerance of mom may instigate early labor.  

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Rather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.

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Authors of a new study suggest that 520-million-year-old structures, previously identified as the brains of ancient arthropods, are instead preserved microbial biofilms.

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image: Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack

By Ruth Williams | March 29, 2018

A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  

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