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image: Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

Anti-CRISPR Protein Reduces Off-Target Effects

By Diana Kwon | July 12, 2017

AcrIIA4, an inhibitor protein from the Listeria bacteriophage, can block DNA from binding to Cas9 during genome editing.

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image: Electrical Stimulation Steers Neural Stem Cells

Electrical Stimulation Steers Neural Stem Cells

By Ashley Yeager | July 3, 2017

Current can guide implanted cells away from rats’ noses toward a region deep in their brains.

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An analysis of human cancer genome projects uncovers a counterintuitive loss of ribosomal gene copies.

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image: How Roundworms Sleep

How Roundworms Sleep

By Diana Kwon | June 22, 2017

When Caenorhabditis elegans surrenders to slumber, the majority of its neurons fall silent.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By Ruth Williams | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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image: Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

Genes Tied to Wasps Recognizing Faces

By Ashley P. Taylor | June 14, 2017

The brains of Polistes paper wasps express different genes when identifying faces than when distinguishing between simple patterns, a study finds.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By Ashley Yeager | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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image: Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

Primates Use Simple Code to Recognize Faces

By Abby Olena | June 1, 2017

Researchers could reconstruct the faces a monkey saw from the patterns of neuronal activity in a certain area of the brain.

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image: Deep Brain Stimulation Without Surgery

Deep Brain Stimulation Without Surgery

By Aggie Mika | June 1, 2017

Using interfering high-frequency currents applied to the surface of the mouse skull, scientists can noninvasively target brain regions buried below the cortical surface. 

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