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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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image: Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

Examining Sleep’s Roles in Memory and Learning

By | June 13, 2016

Autonomic nervous system activity during sleep may help explain variation in the extent to which the behavior aids memory consolidation, a study shows.

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image: Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

Mysterious Eukaryote Missing Mitochondria

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers uncover the first example of a eukaryotic organism that lacks the organelles.

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image: Psychedelic Neuroimaging

Psychedelic Neuroimaging

By | April 13, 2016

“Ego dissolution,” and other things that happen to the human brain on LSD

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image: Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

By | April 7, 2016

Analyzing resting brain scans, researchers can anticipate the brain activities of a person performing a range of tasks. 

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image: Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

By | April 4, 2016

People are attracted to others whose emotions they feel they can easily understand, according to a neuroimaging study.

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image: Minimal Genome Created

Minimal Genome Created

By | March 24, 2016

Scientists build a living cellular organism with a genome smaller than any known in nature.

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image: Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

By | March 4, 2016

Scientists provide a potential biological link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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