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Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.

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image: Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

By | December 4, 2017

T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

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image: The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe

The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe

By | December 1, 2017

An exploration of the genetics of earlobe attachment is just the latest collaborative research project to come out of the personal genetic testing company.

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image: Immune Checkpoint Found Lacking in Type 1 Diabetes

Immune Checkpoint Found Lacking in Type 1 Diabetes

By | November 15, 2017

Boosting levels of a the immunosuppressive protein PD-L1 in blood stem cells halts diabetes in a mouse model of the disease.

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A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 

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image: Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His Body

Child Receives Transgenic Skin Over Most of His Body

By | November 8, 2017

A combination gene-and-cell therapy has given a boy with a grievous skin disease a new lease on life, and has resolved a dermatology debate to boot.

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In people with epilepsy, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) does not affect memory-related brainwaves as widely claimed, researchers report.

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image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By , , and | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.

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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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