News & Opinion

» cell & molecular biology, ecology, immunology and microbiology

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.


image: Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

Monitoring Mutations with Microfluidics

By Ruth Williams | March 15, 2018

A device dubbed the “mother machine” enables real-time observation of mutagenesis in single bacterial cells.  


image: Slime Mold in Residence

Slime Mold in Residence

By Ashley P. Taylor | March 2, 2018

At Hampshire College, students and faculty use the amoeba Physarum polycephalum—both a “visiting scholar” and a model organism—to examine human societal and political quandaries.  


The elimination of the biting pests was an added bonus after researchers unleashed a rat-eradication endeavor on the tiny islands.  


image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

1 Comment

image: Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

Bacteriophages Plentiful in Women’s Bladders

By Abby Olena | February 2, 2018

In one of the first looks at the urinary virome, researchers find hundreds of viruses, most of which have never been sequenced before. 


The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.


image: How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the Body

By Abby Olena | January 17, 2018

Millions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.

1 Comment

The discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients’ recovery following treatment.


Scientists are beginning to unravel the ways in which we develop a healthy relationship with the bugs in our bodies.


Popular Now

  1. Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?
  2. Elena Rybak-Akimova, Chemical Kinetics Expert, Dies
  3. University of Oregon Erecting a $1-Billion Science Center
  4. <em>Homo Sapiens</em> Interbred With Denisovans From Two Different Populations