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image: Learning Opens the Genome

Learning Opens the Genome

By Ruth Williams | January 17, 2018

Researchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.

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image: Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

Rising Temperatures and the Elimination of Male Turtles

By Ruth Williams | January 10, 2018

The near-complete feminization of northern Great Barrier Reef sea turtles has been blamed on climate change.


Researchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.


image: Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity

By Abby Olena | January 8, 2018

Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 


image: Photos of the Year

Photos of the Year

By Katarina Zimmer | December 25, 2017

From a plastic-munching coral to see-through frogs, here are The Scientist’s favorite images from 2017.


image: Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

Hibernating Rodents Feel Less Cold

By Abby Olena | December 19, 2017

Syrian hamsters and thirteen-lined ground squirrels are tolerant of chilly temperatures, thanks to amino acid changes in a cold-responsive ion channel. 


Upping a gene’s expression in rat brains made them better learners and normalized the activity of hundreds of other genes to resemble the brains of younger animals.


Single-cell genome analyses reveal the amount of mutations a human brain cell will collect from its fetal beginnings until death.


Activating genes for reprogramming factors for a short time transforms large numbers of differentiated cells into multipotent forms that could be useful for cell-based therapies.


In people with epilepsy, transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) does not affect memory-related brainwaves as widely claimed, researchers report.

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