News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Anthrax investigation plagues scientist

By | September 10, 2002

Steven Hatfill loses his job and his patience with FBI attention.

0 Comments

Making it to market

By | September 10, 2002

Have federal funds been a boon to the science of fighting terror?

0 Comments

Natural HIV inhibitors

By | September 10, 2002

Saturable intracellular inhibitors prevent HIV/SIV infection by targeting the lentiviral capsid.

0 Comments

One year after

By | September 10, 2002

How has terrorism altered the landscape of life science since 9-11?

0 Comments

Pheromone phenotypes

By | September 10, 2002

Disruption of a genomic cluster of pheromone receptors results in behavioral and chemosensory dysfunction.

0 Comments

Shifting sands

By | September 10, 2002

Scientists struggle to keep up with new regulations while protecting scientific freedom.

0 Comments

The aptness of aptamers

By | September 10, 2002

RNA aptamers can be used to create antidote-controlled anticoagulant agents.

0 Comments

UK e-Science grid goes live

By | September 10, 2002

The vision of almost unlimited computing power for biomedical research has taken a step forward.

0 Comments

Motif controls nicotinic receptors

By | September 9, 2002

A transmembrane motif controls the endoplasmic reticulum release of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits.

0 Comments

Mutant candidate for TB vaccine

By | September 9, 2002

pantothenate auxotroph is highly attenuated and protects mice from tuberculosis.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

  4. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

RayBiotech