News & Opinion

Covering the life sciences inside and out

Most Recent

Hague meeting targets biopiracy

By | April 24, 2002

The UN Biodiversity Congress last week produced guidelines to curb biopiracy but they don't satisfy ecoactivists.

0 Comments

Keeping a CHEK on breast cancer

By | April 24, 2002

Mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for a small percentage of breast cancer cases. In 22 April Advanced Online Publication from Nature Genetics, Meijers-Heijboer and colleagues from the CHEK-Breast Cancer Consortium report the identification of a mutation in the CHEK2 gene that increases the risk of breast cancer in both women and men (Nat Genet 2002, DOI: 10.1038/ng879).They performed a genome-wide linkage search in a family with BRCA-independent breast cancer and id

0 Comments

Notch determines B cell fate

By | April 24, 2002

RBP-J signaling is involved in cell fate determination of marginal zone B cells in the spleen.

0 Comments

Support for use of animals in research

By | April 24, 2002

The UK government has set out in full for the first time its policy on the use of animals in medical research.

0 Comments

2002 Gairdner International Awards announced

By | April 23, 2002

The 2002 awards recognize the impact of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.

0 Comments

Anti-malarial mechanism unraveled

By | April 23, 2002

For more than 50 years antifolate drug therapy has been used successfully to treat malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum. It had been assumed that differences between host and parasite in terms of the drug binding to dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) were responsible for this success. But, in 19 April Science, Kai Zhang and Pradipsinh Rathod of University of Washington, Seattle, show that it may be differences in the regulation of DHFR between host and parasite that explai

0 Comments

Retroviral risk

By | April 23, 2002

Gene therapy with retroviral vectors can increase the risk of developing leukemia.

0 Comments

Wilson leaves UPenn's gene therapy institute

By | April 23, 2002

Director oversaw experiment that led to death of 18-year-old patient in 1999.

0 Comments

Control of bone remodelling

By | April 22, 2002

Constant remodelling of bones — up to 10% of the total mass every year — helps to maintain the optimal levels of calcium in the blood and also the structural function of the skeleton, but the identity of the molecules involved in controlling this process remains unclear. In April 18 Nature, Hiroshi Takayanagi and colleagues from University of Tokyo show that interferon-β (IFN-β) is pivotal in regulating bone homeostasis (Nature 2002, 416:744-749).Takayanagi et al. observed

0 Comments

FOXO transcription factor stimulates repair

By | April 22, 2002

The protein kinase Akt promotes cell survival by phosphorylating and inhibiting FOXO forkhead transcription factors. FOXO factors have been linked to stress responses and the regulation of longevity. In the April 19 Science, Hien Tran and colleagues at Boston's Children's Hospital define a role for the FOXO3a family member in the response to DNA damage (Science 2002, 296:530-534).Tran et al. created a Rat-1 fibroblast cell line expressing a tamoxifen-inducible FOXO3a protein. FOXO3a expression r

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech